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Collection Thomas Neirynck. From sentiment to lyrical expression

From private to public

Reflections

as of 3 February 2022

From private to public

A private collector who donated his life’s work to show it to the public. The collection of patron Thomas Neirynck gives a subjective view of abstract art from the second half of the 20th century, with special attention to Jeune peinture belge and CoBrA, two art movements that brought Belgian artists international fame.

Selected works of great and less great names, all intimates of Neirynck, ranging from post-expressionists to various abstract artists.

Thomas Neirynck

WWII

From private to public

Thomas Neirynck

With the exhibition ‘From private to public’, the FeliXart Museum is examining Thomas Neirynck’s private art collection, which became public thanks to a donation to the King Baudouin Foundation. The life’s work of a patron, it offers a subjective view of abstract art from the second half of the 20th century, with particular attention to Jeune peinture belge and CoBrA, two art movements that brought Belgian artists international fame.

WWII

This exhibition, with works varying from post-expressionism to various forms of abstract art, takes a look at a collector’s mania that originated and was inspired immediately after the end of the Second World War. The collecting itself, as well as the context and networks in which it took place, is part of the set-up. The subjective choice of the collector Neirynck is placed in its time and assessed according to the values that the collection still has today. It is contextualised from its original totality and from the perspective of the donation to the King Baudouin Foundation and the various accessions the collection has had since then.

From private to public

In its exhibition policy, the FeliXart Museum has always been very careful with private collections. Although important private collections are often involved in our projects, we have always guarded against exhibiting a collection in its entirety. In Thomas Neirynck’s case, this is different: his collection became public property, which gives us the opportunity to study this collection in a deontological way. Neirynck’s world was filled with post-war Belgian art, which fits perfectly within the FeliXart Museum’s field of research.